Monthly Archives: November 2012

Why Do We Fish

Biding Some Time?

Biding Some Time?

Why Do We Fish?

 

As a person that spends far too much time thinking about stuff in general, my most recent conundrum was, ‘why do we actually fish?’ I’m sure the obvious answer is to catch fish, but if we look beyond this, what are the other reasons why many of us devote so much time, effort and energy into dangling a line. If you enjoy eating fish, then there are a multitude of supermarkets promoting fresh fish, as well as your long standing local fishmonger.
Both options offer a short cut to an easy meal- significantly cheaper than catching it yourself, too in most cases.
To suggest that this would be a primary reason to fish would also be to assume that there are fish being caught. This is often not the case and I would imagine that an angler’s success rate would be at around 50% in many instances (but not all) as far as takeable fish are concerned, purely speculation of course, but a guess I would happily go with for arguments sake.
If the above category could be referred to as ‘Eaters’ then I will call this the ‘Gamblers’.
I think there is a bit of the gambler in all of us. This undoubtedly stems from very early on in our angling career, where the anticipation of a freshly cast line was immense. What might it herald? Just what may be swimming about out there totally oblivious to the guy shivering at the waters edge just a cast away? This is the ‘what if’ element that the gambler feasts on and keeps him coming back for more, time and time again.
For the novice, this must be the biggest draw, but as time moves on and experience is gained, predictions surrounding the likely hood of an encounter with a species become increasingly predictable. The gambling element becomes distorted, but is still present to some extent and the ‘what ifs’ we once speculated on are dismissed as unlikely at best. That said, it is very wise never to say never.
The third category can be referred to as the ‘seekers’. These are the anglers that stop at nothing in their pursuit to catch what they are looking for. They invest a lot of time, effort
And fuel seeking out their target species. Be it south coast plaice, Yorkshire cod or Bristol Channel sole, these guys are hell bent on getting a result and will stay focused and confident on getting a result. This is not to say they will catch every time. No one can do that. But they will stick at it until they do and the reward will be all the greater for the effort they had ploughed in.
The final category I will call the ‘casuals’. These chaps are happy to escape the domestic jail for a few hours peace and quiet, often in the company of like thinking friends.
They will head to the coast often on a day when the sun is shining, with little consideration to the tide table. They will pitch up in front of the car park and perhaps break out a beer or two. They will edge there bets along with those in close proximity to those around them and the mood will be relaxed and fun. To catch a fish or three will be a bonus, as our man just has a ball in the great out doors with a rod in hand and escapes reality for a few hours.
So who has the right idea if there is such a thing? Far be it for me to make that call. No doubt someone much older and wiser than myself will have a few thoughts though. Personally, I think that as long as you are having fun, whichever category you may put yourself in, that is the key.
You may not consider yourself to fit the description of any of the above, which is fine, remember- these are just the whimsical observations of one angler who chooses to over burden their brain and are not intended to cause offence in the slightest!

Free Post

Free Postage

Free Postage

Hello Everyone
Chance for you to take advantage of our free post offer ending Monday 3rd December …. see T’s and C’s on home page. Also now in stock are the super new slightly smaller Penn Affinity 7000 and Penn Waveblaster 7000 plus Rattle Spoons, Shimano Aernos Bass Lure Reel, and Sidewinder Super Slims.

 

Isome Worms From Marukyu

Isome Worms From Marukya

Isome Worms From Marukya

The new Isome Worms from Marukyu are proving very popular to the extent we have sold out of everything except Pink in the large size …… The good news is that we have lots more colours on the way and should arrive tomorrow ….. and we should receive stock of the XL size early December.

 

Minehead Charterboat Autumn

Andy Bickle 24lb Alykat Cod

Andy Bickle 24lb AlyKat Minehead Cod

Again, the Bristol Channel is coming good as the winter season approaches. Charter boat activity has been nonstop with cod and whiting showing from all recognised marks. A cracking cod of 24lb caught by Andy Bickle from the TOR SAC is the best so far from the “AlyKat” but I won’t hold my breath on that being the best of the season! Most trips are now producing double figure cod, not huge numbers but the fish are certainly there for the taking. The smaller fish are, as usual showing a preference for worm baits. Lug or rag will do but you will need plenty of it! A cod has a huge mouth and will think nothing of devouring a dozen worms and a strip of calamari! When rebaiting, to save those precious worms, simply push the old stuff up the trace and add more on the hook to freshen up, simple! The art (if there is one) to cod fishing is patience. Be prepared to sit it out. After all, when you have been fishing in the same spot for say an hour, you will have laid a huge scent trail for the fish to locate and ascend upon, it seems a shame to move away and leave all that behind!
Whiting have also played a big part in charter trips with some nice fish to around 3lb reported. These fish are a great filler in when the cod are slow. A strip of mackerel fillet will always attract these fish. Beware though, the old conger will be only too glad to relieve you of your whiting bait, and your whiting also if you happen to have one!
Congers are at their most active now here in the Cannel. They will be hell bent on feeding up for the winter. Whiting, herring and sprat will be their favoured food as they attempt to fatten up before they slow up for the winter. After Christmas, the eels will be virtually nonexistent for what reason I guess we’ll never really know, it just seems to be some sort of hibernation thing.
January will be the time to get out there in search of that magical thirty pounder. Historically this is the time to really target the big fish. Massive baits and again, lots of patience will certainly be worth the effort for those lucky few who are prepared to put the effort in.
If you fancy a crack at the Bristol Channel cod run with virtually no steaming time, give me a ring and we’ll see what we can find!
Dave Roberts “AlyKat” Charters Ltd.

Lucy Henderson 16lb Thorny

Lucy Henderson 16lb Thornback Ray From Minehead

Jon Mattick With A Hard Fighting Bristol Channel Cod

Jon Mattick With A Hard Fighting Bristol Channel Cod

 

Tim Poat 12lb Cod

Tim Poat 12lb Cod

Penn Rampage

New Penn Rampages

New Penn Rampages

Great News the new Penn Rampage Beachcasters have just arrived and are in stock https://www.veals.co.uk/acatalog/___Penn_Shore_Rods.html
Check them out on line, lighter and slimmer than the Powerstix and still great prices. For those of you who are after a deal we still have 15’9″ Powerstix in a combo with the Surfblaster 8000 at a super price.

 

 

Latest Sidewinder Packs

Sidewinder Cod Squad

Sidewinder Cod Squad

Check out the latest fishcatchers from Sidewinder

https://www.veals.co.uk/acatalog/Lures.html

New Sidewinder Cod Squad three in a pack including the latest exclusive ‘hot pink’ 6″ srp £7.99 Reduced Intro Price of £5.50

Sidewinder Bass Pack

Sidewinder Bass Pack

New Sidewinder Bass Pack three in a pack including the latest exclusive ‘Yellow Dot’ 6″  srp £7.99 Reduced Intro Price of £5.50

Sidewinder Super Slim

Sidewinder Super Slim

6″ Slim profile Sidewinders in a natural colour. So like the real thing these are going to be deadly for all predators. £5.50 pack

Brazilian Snook

Brazilian Snook

Big snook from kayak in Brazil

Mike Ladle’s third son Richard who lives in Brazil is a keen angler. Rich has been living in a coastal town, Maceio, for about a year and to be honest, although he has caught a fair number of fish, many of them have been small and most were caught on bait. He is a keen lure angler and more recently he has started to get the hang of catching fish on his spinning gear. These efforts culminated, at the end of last April, in him hooking and losing a ‘monster’ while fishing from his kayak, off the beach just outside his house. He sent the following account to Mike:-

 

Hi Dad,

While you were sunning yourself and losing giant tarpon in Tobago I’ve been continuing to explore the kayak fishing just outside my house. I’ve had two notable successes and one oddity since my last report.

First the oddity. I was trolling over the sand near the reef with a slow sinking, trout pattern Rapala when the rod gave a small twang. It looked like the lure had caught a bit of weed but as I wound in I thought I felt the odd fishy knock. Much to my surprise a small peacock flounder was attached to the lure. I remember you catching one of these on a Rapala from a sandy beach in Tobago, but unlike yours my one was quite dull – possibly because the water tends to be a bit murky?

My first ‘success’ was that I finally managed to land a sennet – I think I’ve already told you that I lost one at the boat a while back, so it was good to finally get one in my hands. It jumped around a bit but was much like a jack barracuda – a couple of fast runs followed by a bit of leaping and wriggling. I caught another one a few days later – both taken on a jointed Rapala fairly close to the reef (I ate the first one – delicious fried whole).

Finally, my big success… As you know, after losing a really good fish a couple of months ago I decided to beef the tackle-up. I used the Surepopper instead of the Surespin, out went the old Okuma reel and in came the Stella complete with 50lb braid and 25lb monofilament trace. However, up until yesterday I was still waiting for another bite from something worth catching. It came just as the sun was going down and I was gently drifting into shore, across the sea grass beds where I had had lost the monster fish that dumped me out of the kayak. This time I was spinning from the kayak with the un-jointed, trout-coloured Rapala, plopping the lure about 15m away and winding it back with a steady retrieve. On my last cast of the night the lure was grabbed and the line hissed through the water as a big fish started ripping line from the clutch.

Mindful of my previous pratfall, I hunkered down in the kayak and slowly increased the drag on the Stella – the fish was still making powerful surges but, crucially, I was gaining line in between successive runs and, combined with dragging the kayak against the wind, it was clearly tiring. After 5 minutes I got my first glimpse as a giant silver shape jumped in the gathering murk about 20m away me. After another 5 minutes it was at the boat – a gigantic snook – even bigger than the twenty pounder I caught at Turtle beach a couple of years ago.

Finally, I managed to bring the exhausted fish along the side of the kayak, but was (understandably, I think) nervous about sliding my hands through its gills in case I got caught on the lure. However, by this time the wind had blown me closer to the beach and after 5 more minutes I was able to slip into the water and drag the kayak and the fish towards the shore (about 50 m away). After what seemed like an eternity I finally managed to beach the monster snook – I quickly dragged it up the beach, unhooked it, and offered various thanks to the God of Small Fishermen.

As an interesting aside to this story – I decided to keep the snook, they taste wonderful and retail for about £12 a kilo over here. When I gutted it I found it was full of half-beaks (small needle-fish). It had obviously been up in the eel grass hunting for these tasty little fish. I guess that if I keep flogging away at dusk and dawn I might catch more big snook. This one was a touch under 12kg and just a few pounds short of the Brazilian record.

Hope to see you in Brazil soon,

Rich