Tag Archives: Jansen Teakle

We Fish With You?

In recent weeks we have been asked on numerous occassions, “What does ‘we fish with you‘ mean exactly?” Well, the short answer is that all of the guy’s here at VMO are out on the coast of the Bristol Channel and beyond or fishing afloat on average eighty hours a week. We are just as passionate about fishing as you;  our valued customer and for that very reason we know exactly where you’re coming from when you call or email us to ask for a specific piece of tackle or request some general guidance. 

Just recently, Harry, Jansen and Jeremy enjoyed some pleasant fishing in the Bristol Channel at Kingston Seymour on a stunning spring afternoon. As usual, Jansen had his camera to hand and you can read the full account of the session in the current issue of Sea Angler magazine (issue 544) on sale now.

Harry gets in on the action

Harry gets in on the action

Lift off for Harry!

Fishing for thornbacks

If you’re a fan of Facebook, please feel free to look each of us up and see what we’ve been up to. In the meantime, if you would like to share your good catches with us, drop us an email as we love to see what you have been up to over the weekend!

Tight lines for now and next time you’re out there wetting a line, remember that we probably are too!

 

The Gambling Angler- Bristol Channel Guided Shore Fishing

Jansen Teakle- The Gambling Angler

Jansen has been here at VMO selling you fishing tackle for over eleven years, but as well as also writing for the angling press, appearing on BT Sports and assisting some major UK tackle companies in product development, he recently began a guiding service right here on the Bristol Channel. Jansen can lay claim to many specimen fish captures over the years and has developed an intricate knowledge of the tidal waters of the Bristol Channel.

A nice light line bass for Jansen Teakle

A nice light line bass for Jansen Teakle

Guided angling in the UK is in it’s infancy, but is incredibly popular in the States where angler’s benefit from the experience of a knowledgable guide who will not only know where to find the fish, but also how to go about catching them.

A specimen ray

A specimen ray

The concept of ‘The Gambling Angler’, is a very logical one- You could have the best tackle, the right bait and know exactly where to fish, but when push comes to shove there will always be an element of luck involved. Every time each and every one of us cast’s a line, we are effectively gambling on the outcome and nothing is set in stone!

A gamble that paid off!

A gamble that paid off!

As Jansen’s website, www.thegamblingangler.co.uk, describes it-

To be a successful angler, you need to know where to fish, when to fish and how to fish.

The only way to discover the answer to the above questions is to spend many hours of trial and error, experimenting in all winds and weathers until patterns begin to emerge and you can build your knowledge based upon them. An angling guide is someone who has already done that and is offering a service whereby he can pass that information on to you at a cost.

This couldn’t be more accurate, as despite all of the advise you can gather from books, magazines and internet forums, there is no substitute for good solid practical tuition on the coast. For a small cost, you could easily shave five years of hard work, trial and error off of your angling learning curve and more than likely, start to make regular catches.

A summer smoothhound for the gambling angler

A summer smoothhound for the gambling angler

Jansen is also able to offer bespoke packages for those looking to hire the necessary equipment, with rods reels, clothing and terminal tackle all available. Bait can also be provided, so pretty much all you need to do is turn up and catch the fish!

Based in Weston-super-Mare, Jansen is central to the many popular venues and will be only too happy to hear from you. If you are interested in a fully guided session, why not get in touch via the website and see what he can offer?

For a full price list and everything else you need to know, be sure to take a look.

Everything you need to know- right here!

Everything you need to know- right here!

#getguided #takeagamblewithjansen

www.thegamblingangler.co.uk

Cod Fishing On Chesil Bank

Cod Fishing On Chesil Bank

Apologies for the lack of blog post’s recently. We have a guest blogger this time around, in the form of my good friend Ben Stockley. Ben shares his thought’s on targeting our favourite fish from the UK’s premier venue this coming season…

 

This magical bank of stones stretching 17 miles from Portland through to West Bay is well known for a plethora of different species throughout the year but today I want to reveal some of its secrets for the nation’s favourite fish, Cod. For those starting out or travelling from afar, it can be an intimidating beach to fish, so where do we start?

Pristine Winter Cod

Pristine Winter Cod

In terms of location, the best catches are nearly always made in the deeper water between the sailing academy at Portland through to the Dragons Teeth at Abbotsbury. Water clarity is a big deciding factor on where I chose to fish. Abbotsbury tends to need plenty of colour from a big onshore blow to be worthy of consideration unless you decide to fish at night. The deeper Eastern end of the beach is a real breaker of the Cod rule book and can often produce incredible catches of fish in warm autumnal sunshine and flat, clear seas. This is due to the extra depth of water.

Personal ability is also a deciding factor in when or how you fish. Anyone that is capable of casting consistently over 100 metres with bait should really consider whether it is worth fishing for Cod at night unless other commitments make this a necessity. Shocked? I’ll explain why. As soon as dusk falls, Chesil’s ravenous packs of Dogfish, Pouting and all manner of other undesirables come out to feast upon your hard earned baits. Unless you are lucky enough to drop on a Cod’s nose, it could be hard work. Contrast this to a lovely autumn afternoon sat in sunshine where every bite is usually something of quality. If not a Cod maybe a plump Plaice or a tasty Bream, who knows! For those light on yards, don’t fret you will still catch at 50 metres on occasions, particularly in rough weather or at night. You will just need to wade through a bit more un-wanted by-catch to claim your prize.

 

Crab Bait Does The Business!

Crab Bait Does The Business!

Bait is a simple enough choice. My top 4 in order of effectiveness would be blow lug, peeler crab, hermit crab and fresh black lug. We all get days when we just ‘need’ to hit the beach for a short notice fix without the correct bait and although you’ll catch the odd Cod on frozen blacks or squid, it really is a very poor option compared to fresh.

 

In years like 2014 when there were incredible numbers of fish you may get away with it but even then you will be humbled by an angler next door who’s well prepared.

I am going to be controversial and say avoid tides over 2.0m on the Portland scale. They are too big and although there will be odd exceptions, 1.7-2.0 metre tides usually reign supreme. So when should you hit the beach? Chesil Cod, like most Cod enjoy some flow in the water. Based on the Portland tide times you should start fishing 3.5 hours before high and finish when you lose the right to left flow around 2.5 hours down. Invariably that last hour as the tide eases will be the hot time. You could also try over low water, get there 1 hour before and fish 3 hours back up. Again the last hour as in this case the left to right flow eases, will be key. These scenarios will vary slightly according to exact location, weather and size of the tide but will be a good starting point for most situations.

All the very best of luck for the 2015/16 season, I hope to see you on the beach someday”

Ben Stockley

When To Call It.

The weather is of massive importance to us sea anglers, it’s influence on our playground, be it the coastline or the open sea, is crucial to our chances of what we may or may not catch. Much has been written about how different weather conditions may encourage or discourage our quarry to feed, but how seriously do we as anglers consider our own personal safety when the weather takes a turn for the worse?

Rock fishing

Anglers Beware

Jansen Teakle has a few general pointers to help you make the most of tricky conditions…
Just because there is a strong wind blowing does not automatically mean that the sea in the immediate vicinity is going to be rough. The first thing to do when you acquaint yourself with a new mark (fishing location) is with the use of a map, decide on which compass point the coast is facing. This information is invaluable and will, with experience, tell you just how the area will be affected by any given wind. For example, a mark facing the north will offer protection from a southerly wind and the sea here will become flattened, meaning that even in moderate winds you will be able to fish. On the flip side of this, a raging northerly wind will be blowing straight into the mark and more often than not cause the sea to roughen up, perhaps to a dangerous state if the wind is particularly strong for a prolonged length of time.
Much of the Devon and Cornwall coast faces the Atlantic Ocean and as such this is one of the first areas to take a battering when storms sweep in off of the sea. It is worth remembering that the effects of an ensuing storm will be felt some days ahead of the storm arriving. Simply put, this is because of the weather out at sea causing swells that will develop long before the storm hits the shore. There can be little or no wind when you are fishing, but long travelling rollers that have journeyed in across hundreds of miles and are often referred to as a ‘ground swell’ or ‘ground sea’ can be potentially deadly. This is of greater importance than the actual wind speed and direction and should be the primary deciding factor on whether you choose to give it ago, or come back another day.
Prolonged rainfall following a lengthy dry period can make many cliffs unstable. Rain water seeps into the earth and rock, forcing it apart and making it susceptible to breaking down. Equally, rain water that then freezes and expands will have the same effect. Stay away from these areas during heavy rain and sudden cold spells as this is the most likely time for a landslide/cliff fall to occur.
All of the above is basic stuff, but it is easy to get caught out. Familiarise yourself with the many weather forecasts both on the web and television. They are not always right, but you will be able to build up a reasonably accurate picture of what is happening out there and experience will, over time, enable you to hone this. If you are ever in any doubt, go with your instincts and come back another day when conditions are safer. It is little fun trying to fish when you are constantly wave watching or concerned that the cliff directly behind you is threatening to collapse. Above all else, always make sure someone knows where you are and give them a time when you are likely to return home – mobile phones are next to useless when stuck out on the end of some rock promontory below a towering cliff.

 

Why Do We Fish

Biding Some Time?

Biding Some Time?

Why Do We Fish?

 

As a person that spends far too much time thinking about stuff in general, my most recent conundrum was, ‘why do we actually fish?’ I’m sure the obvious answer is to catch fish, but if we look beyond this, what are the other reasons why many of us devote so much time, effort and energy into dangling a line. If you enjoy eating fish, then there are a multitude of supermarkets promoting fresh fish, as well as your long standing local fishmonger.
Both options offer a short cut to an easy meal- significantly cheaper than catching it yourself, too in most cases.
To suggest that this would be a primary reason to fish would also be to assume that there are fish being caught. This is often not the case and I would imagine that an angler’s success rate would be at around 50% in many instances (but not all) as far as takeable fish are concerned, purely speculation of course, but a guess I would happily go with for arguments sake.
If the above category could be referred to as ‘Eaters’ then I will call this the ‘Gamblers’.
I think there is a bit of the gambler in all of us. This undoubtedly stems from very early on in our angling career, where the anticipation of a freshly cast line was immense. What might it herald? Just what may be swimming about out there totally oblivious to the guy shivering at the waters edge just a cast away? This is the ‘what if’ element that the gambler feasts on and keeps him coming back for more, time and time again.
For the novice, this must be the biggest draw, but as time moves on and experience is gained, predictions surrounding the likely hood of an encounter with a species become increasingly predictable. The gambling element becomes distorted, but is still present to some extent and the ‘what ifs’ we once speculated on are dismissed as unlikely at best. That said, it is very wise never to say never.
The third category can be referred to as the ‘seekers’. These are the anglers that stop at nothing in their pursuit to catch what they are looking for. They invest a lot of time, effort
And fuel seeking out their target species. Be it south coast plaice, Yorkshire cod or Bristol Channel sole, these guys are hell bent on getting a result and will stay focused and confident on getting a result. This is not to say they will catch every time. No one can do that. But they will stick at it until they do and the reward will be all the greater for the effort they had ploughed in.
The final category I will call the ‘casuals’. These chaps are happy to escape the domestic jail for a few hours peace and quiet, often in the company of like thinking friends.
They will head to the coast often on a day when the sun is shining, with little consideration to the tide table. They will pitch up in front of the car park and perhaps break out a beer or two. They will edge there bets along with those in close proximity to those around them and the mood will be relaxed and fun. To catch a fish or three will be a bonus, as our man just has a ball in the great out doors with a rod in hand and escapes reality for a few hours.
So who has the right idea if there is such a thing? Far be it for me to make that call. No doubt someone much older and wiser than myself will have a few thoughts though. Personally, I think that as long as you are having fun, whichever category you may put yourself in, that is the key.
You may not consider yourself to fit the description of any of the above, which is fine, remember- these are just the whimsical observations of one angler who chooses to over burden their brain and are not intended to cause offence in the slightest!